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History

2017

New executive director Gary Renville is hired.

Founding executive director Sallie Neillie retires.

In a pilot with Coordinated Care, we launch our Health Home program, provides intensive, home-based, care coordination services for individuals with one or more chronic conditions.

2016

In partnership with Providence Regional Medical Center Everett, we launch our Primary Link Hospital Inpatient Discharge Program to help low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients find appropriate follow-up care with primary care providers upon discharge from the hospital.

Project Access Northwest celebrates its 10th anniversary. We establish the Sallie Neillie Founder's Circle of donors, who pledge $500 or $1000 a year for three years.

2015

We launched Primary Link, a program that connects Apple Health (Medicaid) and uninsured emergency department patients to a primary care provider close to home. The program also assists patients who were seen at the Country Doctor Community Health Centers (CDCHC) After-Hours Clinic and do not have a primary care provider.

2014

While Care Coordination remains our core service, we launched two innovative programs in 2014: 

Our Premium Assistance Program helps individuals who are eligible to purchase private health insurance on the Washington Health Benefits Exchange, but can’t afford the premiums.

Our Minor & James Partnership provides pacing and care coordination for Medicaid patients seeking specialty care with this provider group, enabling the physicians to continue to provide care despite a huge spike in demand 

2013

The Affordable Care Act is implemented, but the need for an organization like Project Access Northwest continues.

We expand services into Snohomish County and then Kitsap County. We also began coordinating access to specialty dental care in select areas.

2012

Over the last seven years, more than 16,000 patients have been referred to Project Access Northwest for specialty medical and dental care.

Volunteer dental providers contributed more than $725,000 in services to 810 patients at Swedish Community Specialty Clinic.

At the request of Harrison Medical Center and the United Way of Kitsap County, planning began for Project Access Northwest to provide services for Kitsap County residents beginning in 2013.

An environmental scan including personal interviews with nearly 50 of Project Access Northwest’s health care stakeholders resulted in a strategic plan to prepare for and implement patient support for access to specialty medical and dental care as a result of health care reform and the Affordable Healthcare Act.

2011

Project Access officially changed its name to Project Access Northwest to better reflect its expansion to Snohomish County.

A dental care center for Project Access Northwest referrals opened at the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic providing complex extractions.

2010

Snohomish County requested that Project Access expand its service area. Engaging hospital systems and recruiting physicians resulted in initial patient enrollments in the 4th quarter in Snohomish County.

By the end of 2010, Project Access had recruited more than 850 licensed clinicians; 7,250 patients had been referred to Project Access since its inception in 2006.

2009

Project Access is invited to coordinate specialty care services at the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic (SCSC) as Swedish relocates and combines the Mother Joseph Clinic and Glaser Clinic to its First Hill Campus.

The Snohomish County Medical Society approached Project Access to learn more about the potential model for development in Snohomish County.

2006

In addition to the two pilot programs, physicians from Evergreen Medical Center and Group Health Cooperative committed to participate, and King County Project Access is officially “launched.”

2005

Two pilot programs were successfully launched at Pacific Medical Centers and Swedish – Cherry Hill campus. The local partners recommended start-up of an independent non-profit endorsed by the King County Medical Society.

2004

King County local partners began meeting twice monthly to determine if a Project Access-type program (distributed network of specialty charity care) would be viable in King County. Local partners included:

  • Community Health Council of King County
  • Pacific Medical Centers
  • Harborview
  • King County Medical Society
  • Pacific Hospital Preservation & Development Authority
  • Public Health – Seattle & King County
  • Swedish–Providence Campus
  • Washington Health Foundation

2002

King County safety net providers convene to discuss potential solutions to the challenge of accessing specialty services for low-income uninsured and vulnerable patients. Discussions led to multiple attempts to engage local providers and agencies; various models were researched and explored.